[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

moretufflesspuff said:  Miss Bindergarten has featured students with disabilities. Schools first Day of School by Adam Rex has children with disabilities (and the school itself deals with the bullies and being shy).

mrskaaay said:  Daniel Tiger is geared toward the really young, but Chrissy uses braces to walk. The books are based on episodes of the show but leave out bits so you’ll likely see Chrissy, not Chrissy The Handicapped.

goodnightmoonvale said:  There is a Curious George book about how he goes to the park to play with his friend who is in a wheelchair and she’s really good at basketball. It’s called “curious George joins the team”

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

puta-tengo-chistes-locos:

realsocialskills:

flowersandeverythingelse:

realsocialskills:

I think that picture books with disabled characters are probably really important, but I don’t know of many.

I’m looking for books that are *not* disability awareness books, but books where disability is just part of the world.

Eg: I saw a picture book once that was about going to the doctor, and one of the people working in the office was an adult wheelchair user. She wasn’t sick, she was just at work working. 

Does anyone know what that book is called? Or other picture books where disabled characters exist but the story isn’t about disability awareness?

http://offbeathome.com/book-for-child-with-disability/

This is a link to the author’s piece about the children’s book they published, Meet Clarabelle Blue. In the author’s words, they tried to focus very much on the character’s life, as she happens to be disabled, and not on her disability. It might fit a bit of the kind of books you’re looking for.

Thank you!

An author came and worked with one of my students and he has a whole series of picture books The disability gang! I love them and so do my kids! Also the author has a disability himself.

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

sappholococcus:

realsocialskills:

I think that picture books with disabled characters are probably really important, but I don’t know of many.

I’m looking for books that are *not* disability awareness books, but books where disability is just part of the world.

Eg: I saw a picture book once that was about going to the doctor, and one of the people working in the office was an adult wheelchair user. She wasn’t sick, she was just at work working. 

Does anyone know what that book is called? Or other picture books where disabled characters exist but the story isn’t about disability awareness?

I remember the Miss Bindergarten’s Kindergarten picture books had a student in the kindergarten class who used a wheelchair, but the books weren’t about disability.

July 4th

2017-06-25 20:38
[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

theexoticvet:

July 4th is almost here, please take the time to ensure you and your pets are prepared. Many pets have noise phobia and fireworks can be torturous to them. We see lots of hit by car cases and lost pets this time of year because pets get afraid and run away, sometimes even breaking through windows and doors because they are so scared.

  • Make sure your pets are microchipped AND that all the information is up to date. This is the best way to reunite you if the worst happens.
  • Keep pets inside during the holiday, even animals that seemed fine before can become scared and will bolt or injure themselves.
  • If you know your pet is scared, go to the vet now. There are lots of solutions ranging from Thundershirts to a really great medication for noise phobia called Sileo. Your vet can help you choose.
  • If having a BBQ or cookout, make sure guests know not to give food to your pets. Our ER’s are full of dogs with pancreatitis and other GI disorders the day after.
  • Clean up! Pets will eat trash, firework wrappers, wooden skewers, etc. Never underestimate what they will and won’t eat and play it safe and don’t leave anything around.
[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

flowersandeverythingelse:

realsocialskills:

I think that picture books with disabled characters are probably really important, but I don’t know of many.

I’m looking for books that are *not* disability awareness books, but books where disability is just part of the world.

Eg: I saw a picture book once that was about going to the doctor, and one of the people working in the office was an adult wheelchair user. She wasn’t sick, she was just at work working. 

Does anyone know what that book is called? Or other picture books where disabled characters exist but the story isn’t about disability awareness?

http://offbeathome.com/book-for-child-with-disability/

This is a link to the author’s piece about the children’s book they published, Meet Clarabelle Blue. In the author’s words, they tried to focus very much on the character’s life, as she happens to be disabled, and not on her disability. It might fit a bit of the kind of books you’re looking for.

Thank you!

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

Ettina Kitten said:

I haven’t read it, but I’ve heard that So Don’t! & See What Happens by Sarah Leal is a picture book with a main character in a wheelchair who uses AAC and the plot isn’t about her disability.

realsocialskills said:

Thank you! It looks like it might be hard to get ahold of a copy, but it’s good to know it exists. 

Does anyone else know of books like that?

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

I think that picture books with disabled characters are probably really important, but I don’t know of many.

I’m looking for books that are *not* disability awareness books, but books where disability is just part of the world.

Eg: I saw a picture book once that was about going to the doctor, and one of the people working in the office was an adult wheelchair user. She wasn’t sick, she was just at work working. 

Does anyone know what that book is called? Or other picture books where disabled characters exist but the story isn’t about disability awareness?

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

Women are people. Women face misogyny regardless of what they do.

Sometimes people do bad things. Some of the people who do bad things are women.

When women do bad things, that justifies criticism. It does not justify misogyny, or sexualized insults.

For instance: If a female politician votes against health care for poor people, it’s important to talk about how that will get people killed.

That doesn’t make it ok to call her ugly, mock her body, or make comments about how she needs to get laid. None of that has anything to do with health insurance. None of that is valid criticism. None of that serves any constructive purpose. It’s just misogyny.

Directing misogynistic insults at any woman is harmful to all women. It sends the message that there’s no problem with misogyny so long as the woman is a bad person who has it coming somehow. This implies that the only real disagreement about misogyny is about which women deserve it. 

We need to object to misogyny in principle, regardless of who the target is. Misogyny is not criticism. It’s just destructive hatred.

[syndicated profile] omgcheckplease_feed


The drinks at the Falcs Family BBQ were very strong and there are so many people who need to know about Eric Richard Bittle.

Blocking is not evidence

2017-06-21 12:00
[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

People get to decide who they do and don’t want to talk to.

Online, part of what that means is that people can block each other. People who don’t want to talk to each other can make the conversation stop.

If someone blocks someone else, all it means is that they’ve decided to stop talking to them. In almost all cases, you have every right to do that.

Blocking someone doesn’t mean you’ve lost an argument. (Similarly, if someone else blocks you, that doesn’t mean you’ve won or that you’re better than them.) It just means that you’ve chosen to stop talking to someone.

There’s nothing wrong with ending a conversation. You don’t have to interact with everyone who wants your attention. You have the right to have boundaries and you have the right to use technology to enforce them.

The only time it’s wrong to block people is if they are entitled to your attention for some reason. That’s rare, and mostly applies to corporations and elected officials. 

Blocking is not a punishment or a confession of weakness. It’s a boundary.

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

Most people act the way they think people act. When people talk about what people are like, assume they’re including themselves.

For instance:

If a boss says that all bosses exploit employees, they’re likely to be terrible to work for.

If a man says that all men are rapists, misogynists, or abusers, he’s likely not a very safe person to be alone with.

If someone says that all marginalized people need to lash out at privileged people, it’s likely that they’ll eventually consider you privileged and lash out at you.

There are any number of instances of this. People tend to act the way they think people act. When people tell you how people act, or how people in a group they’re part of act, err on the side of assuming that they may act that way too.

[syndicated profile] realsocialskills_feed

Our culture often sends the message that if you were abused as a child, you’ll inevitably abuse your children.

It’s not true. I know multiple people personally who grew up in violent homes who have chosen not to be abusive. They experienced violence as children; they do not commit acts of violence as adults. It is possible, it is happening, and people making that choice deserve more respect and recognition.

It’s easier to learn how to parent well from growing up with good parents. It’s also possible to learn from other people. I know this because I’ve seen people do it. To some extent, *everyone* learns from people other than their own parents. (Including their own children. Kids are born with minds of their own, and people who respect their children learn a lot from them about how parenting can and can’t work.) 

It’s a matter of degree. Everyone needs some degree of help and support in learning how to parent; some people need more help and support. Abuse (among other things) may mean that someone needs more help learning parenting; it does not mean that someone will inevitably become an abuser. 

I think we need to talk about this more. Abuse survivors should not be treated as broken monsters. Violence is a choice, and abuse survivors are capable of choosing nonviolence. Abuse survivors are full human beings who have the capacity to make choices, learn skills, and treat others well. 

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Rachel Coleman

June 2017

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